Print Exchange

I am participating in a print exchange at the Remarque Print Workshop in Albuquerque New Mexico. Each participant has created an edition of 11 prints on 8 x 10 paper. In return, each will receive 10 randomly selected prints from other participants sometime this month. I can’t wait to see these prints! This is a great way to share work and to collect the work of other artists, as well as supporting an arts organization or cause.

I created the above print, “Hydrangea,” for the exchange. The image size is 7 x 8.5″. (Mokuhanga -Japanese water-based woodblock- 5 colors, 10 impressions, Bamboo Select 170 gsm paper from Awagami Paper Factory)

The print show is now open online, and features 80 printmakers employing a wide variety methods and media. Each print is available for sale at $75. Half of all proceeds will go to the gallery’s education fund. You can read more about the gallery, see the prints, and buy one here:

https://www.remarqueprintshop.com/print-exchange-2021.html

Japan MI-Lab Artist Residency

I am following a new path in my work: woodblock printmaking using the Japanese technique known as moku hanga. My experience with Katazome — its simple materials, tools, and its familiar rhythms of preparation and repetition has naturally led me to to explore this new direction. 

Mount Fuji from Lake Kawaguchiko

One year ago I was in Fuji-Kawaguchiko, Japan participating in a five week long artist residency at the Mokuhanga Innovation Lab (MI-Lab). Each session invites, through a juried application process, six artists from around the world to learn Japanese woodblock printmaking from master printmakers. This was a transformative experience for me and I am so grateful to have participated!

Garden behind Itchiku Kubota Museum

Memories that linger: the beautiful and quiet town of Katsuyama near Mount Fuji and Lake Kawaguchiko; the awe-inspiring presence of the mountain (“Fuji-San”); the rhythms and tasks of the studio and daily life with this small group of diverse artists.

Lake Kawaguchiko

Our Sensei, Chihiro Taki , and two visiting Sensei (Ayao Shiokawa and Michiko Hamada) shared their expertise and demonstrated many intriguing possibilities for a contemporary approach to this ancient art form. I know that my work will continue to be transformed by this learning.

Tokyo Alley Cat

During this year I made three prints (images below), which are now available in my online shop.

Bees, Bears, and Blossoms – Part 3

Katazome is traditionally done on fabric, but can also be done on paper with good results. The trick is choosing a paper (and pigments) that can be soaked in water for about 30 minutes.

I tried this new stencil as a single image (rather than repeat design) on handmade Japanese kozo (mulberry fiber) paper. Because the paper must be soaked to wash off the rice paste resist, it must be a paper that can withstand that. I had done a few experiments with katazome on kozo in the past, so knew that kozo would be a good choice. I haven’t yet tried watercolor paper, but that is also a possibility. In addition, the pigments used must be able to stand a soaking in a water bath. I mixed my pigments with soybean juice (just as with cloth), and once the work is dry, the colors are locked into the paper because the soybean juice acts as a “protein polymer” when dry. (This is how John Marshall describes it in his book, Salvation Through Soy.